Quality #7: Positive Attitude

    Quote from Forbes Article:

    You want to keep your team motivated towards the continued success of the company, and keep the energy levels up. Whether that means providing snacks, coffee, relationship advice, or even just an occasional beer in the office, remember that everyone on your team is a person. Keep the office mood a fine balance between productivity and playfulness.

    If your team is feeling happy and upbeat, chances are they won’t mind staying that extra hour to finish a report, or devoting their best work to the brand.

    We had already addressed this a bit in #4: Sense of Humor. In this case, the key phrase in my opinion is the reminder that everyone on your team is a person.

    This is such a good insight into the fact that as managers, superiors, bosses, leaders, we often forget that our staff are people too. We tend to treat them like they are disposable. That they live to serve our needs, and they should do what we tell them to, just because we’re the boss. What this reminds us is that they have needs, they have feelings, and they deserve our respect. In reality, our job is to serve them, not in the sense of being their slaves, but in the sense of really taking care of them so they have the ability to help us out.

    I try to learn the names of all of our staff. Often, this is a bit of a difficult task because we can have anywhere between 60-70 people working at any one period of time. But I personally want to know more about them. I want to know who they are. I want to know how they’re feeling. I want to know what their current needs are, and how we can best meet those needs. You see, I think having a positive attitude is more than just smiling all the time or wearing a mask of joy. It’s truly caring for the people around you, and looking out for their best, even if that is above your own needs. It means being perceptive of the indicators around you, and even though they may not verbalize their needs, you have to recognize it and fulfill it. A positive attitude is only worth something if it leads to a loving action.

    A while back, I noticed that a few of our drivers were having a tough time making it to work because they didn’t have a reliable vehicle, or they only had one family car to share amongst multiple family members (wife, brothers, sisters, parents, etc). So I made it my goal to help each and every one of our drivers to buy their own car in the next year or so, provided they actually wanted a car. So I am in the midst of asking them, one by one, if they want a vehicle. Then I help them analyze their financial situation to see if they can actually handle the added expense. I help them identify holes in their budget of where they may be bleeding money, and advise them on what they can change in their spending habits to control the waste and afford a positive benefit like a car. For many of them, this is the first time they’ve ever made a budget or looked at their financials besides the annual tax return they have H&R Block do for them.

    Finally, because many of our drivers do not have much credit rating, I loan them a thousand or two thousand dollars to buy a used car on craigslist. They pay me back over a few months, and then I have the money to help a few others do the same thing.

    So far I have helped 3 people get their own car. They are in the process of paying me back, they are learning responsibility in having to care for a car and having to budget for things they want, and I’m already in talks with three others to do the same when I get enough capital paid back to help someone else.

    Sometimes it’s not about just making someone feel good. You have to get in there, help them out, and show them that you really care.

    JOHNNY TSU